Wildly Deliciously Canned Dungeness Crab from Washington

Sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone to discover something delicious, local, and timely.

In September my husband and I headed out to the Westport, Washington, which is a small remote fishing town located on the Pacific Ocean. About three hours from Seattle, this town has long been a favorite misty destination for us. For many years we brought our kids out there and spent many a summer weekends camping at the state parks. This year, as empty nesters, we decided to head out to Westport after Labor Day. School was back in session and the weather looked to be great.

Of course, trolling the large marina which features an array of fishing and crabbing boats was on our list. Home to a large commercial fishing fleet, Westport has a decidedly salty air. The fog horn blows continuously in the distance. Seafood processing facilities dot the down town…peppered alongside bars, salt water taffy shops, and fish and chips style restaurants.

On this visit I decided to check out Merino’s Seafoods. Locally owned and operated for decades, this no frills shop features seafood and shellfish harvested in the wild from the North Pacific by local fishing vessels just miles off the Washington coast. Merino’s also does all the processing and canning in house only feet from the dock where the seafood is brought in. Local charter boats send their customers to Merino’s in order to get their catch of salmon or albacore tuna processed (filleted and vacuum packed) to their specification. Merino’s also has a full service seafood market and a great fish and chips window which is a new addition since the pandemic.

I had driven by Merino’s many times while in Westport but this year I ventured in. There was more buzz around the place. Sports fishermen were flocking there with the massive quantities of tuna they had caught that day. The fish and chips window had a steady stream of customers daily. In their compact and bustling retail market, I found a crowd of fishermen waiting to pay their processing bill. I also found a large wall featuring cans of local seafood-tuna, salmon, sturgeon, oysters, crab, razor clams and more. I have relied on canned seafood, mainly clams and salmon, in my kitchen for many years but with food inflation and security on everyone’s minds these days I decided to explore the other canned options. The canned Dungeness immediately caught my eye.

My husband and I often catch our own Dungeness crab in the Puget Sound but that’s an arduous task on many levels. I also sometimes splurge and buy the one pound plastic tubs of fresh Dungeness crab at Costco but even that has topped $50 a container in the last couple years. I soon reasoned the canned wild Dungeness crab could be a luxurious pantry item! (Most of the canned crab in the markets these days is imported from Asian and I simply never buy it.) This locally caught and processed crab seemed like the perfect solution!

When I got to the register to buy a can, the chatty gal at the counter assured me it was high quality, as she herself was “a shaker”, which is someone trained in the messy task of picking the crab. She told me she had even trained her daughter the skill cause not that many folks can do it these days! When I asked where it was processed she nodded towards the back of the building and said, “Here!” That was all I needed to know so I turned around and bought 8 more cans! It was a good investment!

Last week I finally got round to cracking a can and decided to craft a simple crab salad inspired by a recipe from a vintage 1970s Scandinavia cookbook. When I opened the can I was greeted with gorgeous crab segments and underneath found the picked flakier crab. Yes, this was a deliciously luxurious find. Tweaking the ingredients, I soon had a spectacularly fresh tasting Krabbsallad. A luxury indeed!

To order by mail, contact Merino’s Seafood.

Canned Wild Dungeness Crab from Merino’s Seafood in Westport Washington

Scandinavian Crab Salad with Lemon, Celery and Dill

Convenient wild Dungeness crab with a Scandinavian flavor
Prep Time10 mins
Course: Salad
Cuisine: American
Keyword: canned crab, canned seafood, scandinavian, seafood, wild seafood
Servings: 2

Equipment

  • large bowl
  • sharp knife
  • cutting board

Ingredients

  • 1 can Merino's Wild Dungeness Crab
  • 1 Lemon, juiced
  • 2 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon finely minced onion
  • 2 Tablespoons light mayonnaise
  • 1 Tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  • Open the can of Dungeness crab, draining the juice from the can, if desired. Put the crab in a large bowl and toss well to combine and break up the meats. Pick out any shell or cartilage if found.
  • Add the lemon juice, celery, onion, mayonnaise, fresh dill and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Combine the crab with the ingredients, tossing gently. Transfer crab salad to a glass jar and chill. . Serve over fresh baby lettuce, sliced tomato or dollop it into a halved and pitted ripe avocado.
  • Serves 2 for lunch.

How to Grow Edibles in a Small Space

Do you have an itchy green thumb? A thumb that wants to get down and dirty in the garden but you don’t have a lot of space or are limited to a balcony or a strip by the driveway?

Well, fear not and dig in.

As someone who has been gardening for over thirty years now, I’ve learned that lots can be grown in small pockets and in containers. Although I have a Seattle Community P Patch plot and raised vegetable beds in my yard, I remain fascinated with what can be grown in the smallest nooks and crannies.

Over the years, I have experimented with varieties bred or appropriate for mini plots. Some of these varieties are Tumbling Tom tomatoes, Astia Zucchini, and Pixie Cabbage, all of which I have grown from seed. I even have container raspberries, Raspberry Shortcake, growing abundantly in containers in a shady corner of my yard as well as in my P Patch.

If you are just getting started, the best thing you can start with are herbs, edible flowers, and tender lettuces! Many of the tender herbs, such as dill, chives, chervil, parsley, basil and cilantro, can easily be sown by seed in a pot or planter filled with potting soil. Kept relatively moist and even with only scattered sunlight, the seeds will sprout and eventually push forth enough herbaceous material to be snipped and scattered over an egg, a pasta, a homemade pizza or into a restorative soup.

This year, I am trying the Pot and Patio lettuce blend, which I ordered last week from Territorial Seed Company. The catalogue describes the mix as: “Tailored specifically for the container gardener, this lively blend of vibrant green and deep, rich burgundy lettuces will maximize your salad green production in the tiniest of spaces.” So, of course, I wanted to try the blend after reading that description!

The seed catalogues, such as Burpee, Johnny’s Selected Seeds, and Territorial Seed Company offer an abundance of herb seeds and they often offer specifics on which varieties are good for containers. That said, ordering seeds by mail can get pricey, so just head to the local nursery or garden center and troll the seed racks for inspiration. If sowing from seed isn’t your thing, buy starts and tuck them into the containers. (Organic violas, can be grown from seed, but they are a great option for buying as a start. Inexpensive and perky, the cheerful flowers make lovely garnishes on salads, platters or even perched on logs of goat cheese!) Starts, though not as economical as seeds, are a good way to jettison your way towards success. While shopping for starts, ask the specialists at the nursery if they carry varieties suited for containers, and look for icons on the plant labels, such as a mini container, which are indicative that the plants can thrive in small spaces.

Don’t fret too much, just do it.

In a few months time, you’ll be tending your own little homestead whether it’s on the driveway, the patio, the balcony or the backyard. Here is some inspiration from my little garden. Stay tuned for more inspiration on edibles in small spaces!

A Kaleidoscope of Blooms in the Skagit Valley

Every spring Washington’s fertile Skagit Valley, located about 60 miles north of Seattle, turns into a kaleidoscope of blooms, color, and incredible beauty when the tulip fields burst forth in April!

This year, despite a very cool and rainy spring, the tulips are as enchanting as ever.

On Easter Sunday, my husband and I took a little staycation daytrip up to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, which was started back in 1984 by the Mount Vernon Chamber of Commerce and was a mere two day event back then. The festival now encompasses the full month of April and offers a wide array of events, art shows, cycling tours, displays, contests and of course fields abloom in color!

Our daytrip involved leaving Seattle early in the morning, with our $15 Roozengaarde Tulip Festival tickets in hand. Each fall I order my bulbs from Roozengaarde, which is the largest bulb grower in the United States, so I love to see their display gardens and fields at this time of year.

Indeed, they were stunning when we were there. We arrived early and the crowds and traffic grew exponentially by the time we left. (Hint: get up and arrive EARLY, especially if it’s a sunny day!) The photo opportunities were massive as the colors were amazing. The brilliant blue sky with puffy white clouds was the perfect backdrop!

Thanks to the cool and rather wet weather we are having here in the Pacific Northwest, the reports are that the tulip fields will remain in full bloom through the end of the month and perhaps even into early May. So, if you are so inclined and need a dose of spring cheer, head to the picturesque Skagit Valley for a healthy dose of spring!

Tulips: The Garden’s Spring Miracle

Tulips! They really are mighty little miracles!

Think about it. They start their residency in the garden as frumpy brown orbs buried deep in the soil in October or November. They are usually planted here in Seattle on a dark rainy day and are then left to hibernate all winter. They endure snow, darkness, endless storms and in some cases marauding squirrels inclined to dig them up.

Then come mid winter, they start to peek out from the ground and slowly but surely send forth beautiful green leaves, then stalks and ultimately a burst of brilliant color! I have always loved tulips but it was during the spring of 2020, at the height of the COVID shutdowns, that I gained a renewed appreciation for them.

Clearly defying the odds, they bring so much sumptuous color and sheer joy. And, from a busy gardener’s perspective, they require very little fuss, which to me is a true mystery.

As I admire my tulip bed this year and tuck the gorgeous flowers into vases, pitchers, tea tins and jam jars around the house, I marvel at life’s littlest miracles!

Here’s a tour of my tulips this year!

Get Growing with Winter Sowing-A Thrifty and Easy Seed Starting Method

Last January, I was sitting on my couch moping and wondering when things would spring back to life. The world as we knew it was shut down. The day was dark and rain was pelting the windows.

I was scrolling aimlessly through Instagram.

One simple post caught my eye. A gal in New York City (a gal who was clearly as bored as I was!) had planted a bunch of seeds in clear seltzer bottles and milk jugs and explained she was experimenting with “winter sowing.” Curious about this winter sowing thing, I went down that Instagram rabbit hole and discovered an ingenious system for sowing seeds, outside, during the winter months without the use of supplementary heat, light, or a classic greenhouse!

This was just the project I needed to push me off the couch and into action!

Developed over twenty years ago by Trudi Davidoff, a resident of Long Island, winter sowing is a system she devised when she wanted to start her plants by seed but lacked a lot of space inside. Using simple recycled materials such as translucent milk jugs, salad boxes and soda bottles, winter sowing harnesses the power of nature on many levels, and for me last year, it resulted in an incredible organic kitchen garden that brought a bountiful harvest!

At first, I was doubtful that sowing seeds in January in jugs and setting them outside in the elements would work, so rather than gambling with my expensive seeds from Johnny’s Selected Seeds and Territorial Seeds, I headed to Dollar Tree where I bought an array of packets-bachelor buttons, larkspur, kale, Parris Island Romaine lettuce, lavender and more. At 25 cents per packet, I figured my investment wasn’t huge by any means, so it was a perfect opportunity to test the task. 

Wow! I planted my first seeds—Lupines, larkspur, lettuces in mid-January and by mid-February, I had growth and green sprouts coming up. Even in the midst of a massive Valentine’s Day weekend snow storm, my little plants stayed cozy enough to survive. This was the only proof I needed to go full steam ahead. Within weeks, I had sown probably more than 40 milks jugs with everything from zucchini, beans, peas, sweet peas, sunflowers, and even tomatoes!

My efforts paid off in the spring when I had tons of garden ready flowers and vegetables to plant easily from the jugs to the garden beds. Because the plants had grown outdoors, they were acclimated to the elements and didn’t need to be hardened off or coddled before going into their new homes. (A big bonus for the busy gardener!) When I transplanted them, I did make sure to cover the tender plants with the milk jugs or a clear salad box, to protect them from birds, crows and Seattle’s infamous slugs.

 My garden got a huge jump start in and when the vegetables and annual flowers started appearing in the local nurseries in April and May, it was clear that I had saved myself a ton of money because the prices for basic garden vegetables had skyrocketed.

Furthermore, options were extremely limited due to the pandemic challenges at hand.

So, if you want to grow more flowers and vegetables by seed and save yourself a ton of money this spring, gear up now and get winter sowing!

The method involves harnessing supplies such as translucent one gallon milk jugs, duct tape, scissors or a sharp Exacto knife, high quality organic potting soil, a Sharpie, labels and seed packets.

I started by slitting four or five holes in the bottom of thoroughly sanitized and rinsed milk jugs, and then slicing around the milk jug equator, but leaving the milk jug intact at the handle so it can be opened up like a little cloche when weather gets warmer. The milk jug cap is discarded, as the little hole at the top will allow rain to drizzle in and maintain a moist environment. I then put about four inches of organic potting soil in the bottom of the milk jug, wet the soil thoroughly until water runs through the holes in the bottom, add a packet of seeds, label the container, and then use the duct tape to seal the equator slit.  The jug is then set outside. It’s pretty much a “set it and forget it” method much like a slow cooker!

In my yard I set the jugs on a southeast side of the house where they simply hang out until they are naturally inclined to sprout. (As the season warms up, the jugs do need to be checked intermittently to make sure they don’t dry out or get too hot but that’s part of the fun and daily joy of checking the little jugs!)

I’m continually amazed by my “Milk Jugs Miracles” because they endure rain, frost, and even last year’s heavy  February snow only to spring to life when the seeds are ready. This year on Martin Luther King weekend, I got started by planting leeks, Tom Thumb lettuce, Parris Island Romaine, and Marvel of Four Seasons lettuce. Incredibly, those lettuces are already springing to life! My heirloom sweet peas, planted later in the month, are now also swelling and pushing forth!

I love this simple economical method so much, I am hosting a winter sowing workshop at my Seattle P Patch in order to share the method with my fellow P Patch gardeners.

An excellent resource for further information is the Winter Sowers Facebook page, which was started by Trudi and now has over 75,000 members from all over the world.

My Top 5 Kitchen Tools to Tackle Food Inflation

Well, let’s make no bones about this. Inflation is indeed here. I predicted massive price hikes last January and told my kids to batten down the hatches because it was coming in all forms.

Now, even mainstream media is reporting on this nasty fiscal reality.

I realize I can’t fix inflation but there is a lot I can do to ride the wave. One of my best tactics? Cook and cook more at home, relying on basic items such as dried beans, frozen and canned vegetables, an array of dried herbs and spices and a freezer stocked with meats and seafood. With a well-stocked arsenal and a little creativity, I’m finding I can safeguard the budget to a certain degree and still enjoy a nice entrée at the end of the day.

That said, there are many kitchen items that make an inflation fighting home cook more efficient and successful. Here’s are my top five tools:

High Quality Chef’s Knife

                Do NOT cut corners here, folks! A dull knife is more dangerous than a sharp one because it’s more likely to slip under pressure and cut you when you are trying to force that dull blade through something like a bagel or dense vegetable. I’ve had my 10-inch Dick’s Chef Knife since I purchased it at Peter Kump’s Cooking School in 1989 and I’ve used it every day since. Other great knife options? Wusthof Classic. When choosing a knife, go to the store and ask to hold it in your hand to see if it’s a good fit. Once you’ve found the knife, take care of it, and DON’T put it in the dishwasher!

Good Saucepans with Fitting Lids

                Invest in a few good saucepans in varying sizes. You’ll use them for everything from steaming those frozen vegetables to cooking a box of pasta dragged out from the pantry after a long day of work. I have a few decent Farber ware pans, but admittedly I love my Le Creuset saucepans which I use daily. Yes, they are pricey and can be hard to source given the global supply chain issues, but if you can get your hands on one or two, do it. They last forever.

Le Creuset Dutch Ovens

                Another versatile and indispensable piece of cookware? My Le Creuset Dutch ovens. These are the true workhorses in my house. Made in France, they come in a range of sizes and colors and work equally as well on the stovetop as they do in the oven. They are the perfect tool for stews, soups, braises, and even baking breads. An investment that will return delicious dividends for decades. There are less expensive Dutch ovens available, and they could work fine for your budget but I’m just partial to Le Creuset. They heat evenly and stand up to so much. In the end, quality and investments pay off. Plus they last for generations. Truly.

Instant Pots

                Instant Pots! Many folks shy away from these electric cookers because they find the electronic dashboard and options a bit intimidating to navigate. That said, it’s worth reading the instruction manual and giving it a shot. These versatile cookers are priceless because the pressure-cooking feature cooks foods in a fraction of the time and magically maintains pressure to handle the task with little input from the cook. I use mine, the original Duo for making bone broths, cooking economical dried beans, vegetable soups and tomato sauce. I use the pressure steam feature to cook items like potatoes, salmon and even artichokes and hard-boiled eggs. The yogurt feature is also amazing at cranking out deliciously decadent yogurt from a basic quart of milk! (The price of one quart of Chobani Greek Yogurt is now tipping  $7 a quart out here in Seattle so it’s a valuable feature indeed. Do the math on that one!) So, to put it simply don’t overlook the power of this wonderful pot! If you need a little extra support or inspiration, check out the 1000 tested recipes on their website.

The Cuisinart Food Processor

Of all the items listed here, I have to say my Cuisinart Food Processors are perhaps my favorite inflation busting tool! I have three that sit on my counter and indeed they get used all the time. My mini chopper is the one that gets pulled forth nearly every day now that we are empty nesters and it’s the one that gets called into action for thrifty homemade vinaigrettes crafted from kitchen staples such as mustard, oil, vinegar, and herbs. The mini also cranks out a super cilantro chimichurri that dresses up a simple piece of Alaska cod pulled from the fish drawer in the freezer. My Cuisinart Pro Custom 11 Cup processor is the tool I use to make lemony chicken salad from leftover roast chicken or a creamy shawarma hummus. When the shredding and slicing blades are clicked into place on my Pro Custom, I process an endless array of cabbage, carrots and onions in a flash which lets me sidestep the pricey prepared veggies section in the product department. (Here in Seattle, we pay a 10% tax on prepared food items so that adds an extra layer of expense to an already pricey item!) This mid-size processor is also the one I use to make my No Rise Pizza Dough.

So, with food inflation here to stay, it’s time to gear up and act! What is your tool?

Next up? Fighting inflation one seed at a time…in my little urban kitchen garden!

Get Growing: Brighten your Space with Cyclamen!

Now that the holidays are over and the decorations are packed away, the house always seems a little less exciting. That said, last weekend I decided to take a lead from my mom and spruce up the space with some indoor flowering plants.

When I was growing up my mom always had amaryllis blooming in the house after the holidays and well into January. I missed the boat on planting amaryllis and narcissus this holiday season so on Saturday I strolled over to Seattle’s Swanson’s Nursery and was cheerfully greeted at the entrance with a sea of cyclamen! Small in size and featuring bright pink, red or white flowers, these little plants are the perfect antidote to the dreary weather we have been having here in the Emerald City. Priced at about $8 and long blooming, I figured they were a thrifty way to satisfy my antsy green thumb and bring cheer to the kitchen table!

A sea of cyclamen at Swanson’s Nursery

I bought two pink ones. At home I removed them from the four inch pots and nestled them in a small brass planter purchased the day before at the thrift store. My little flowering composition now sits at the breakfast table and indeed brightens the room. Easy to care for, they only require water every few days and a pinching off of any dead blooms. With a little TLC they will continue to bloom, and apparently, they will die off in spring but they will come back to life next year!

For me, this “kitchen garden” keeps my itchy thumb active until the seed packets come out…

Washington Lamb Burger with a Moroccan Twist

Inspired by the cuisine of Morocco, these savory lamb burgers feature mint, coriander (fresh and dried), garlic, and cumin which results in a delicate yet intensely flavored burger that can be served over a salad, with a pita or in a traditional bun.

Back in September my husband, daughter and I took a day trip up to Christianson’s Nursery in the scenic Skagit Valley. The nursery is one of my favorite sources for unique plants but on this sunny Sunday our destination was The Skagit Valley Farmers Market held in The Vinery, a recently restored 6000 square foot historic pea vining site. This was the inaugural year for the market, which ran from May to September and on this Sunday the local artisans, farmers, ranchers, beekeepers and bakers offered an array of lovely items.

After poking around the simply stunning Vinery with my daughter, I started to hunt down my husband and eventually found him talking to Mike Donnelly of Martiny Livestock LLC, a small family ranch located in Birdsview, WA. Mike was enthusiastically showing my husband the cuts of processed and vacuum-packed lamb he had on hand. I then saw a sign on the table indicating we could purchase a whole lamb as opposed to cuts.

In short order, we arranged for pickup, and I now have an array of different lamb cuts at the ready-steaks, chops, ribs, and about 15 one pound packages of ground lamb. I’ve always loved a good lamb burger so I started to mentally fabricate flavor profiles that could work with such a treasure trove in the freezer.

Last week during a cold and dark rainy afternoon I decided to get adventurous and developed a Moroccan-inspired lamb burger. I basically added diced onion, fresh mint, and coriander, plus garlic, cumin and ground coriander with some panko and an egg. My husband formed the mixture into three five-ounce patties using a hamburger ring. Grilled outside during that horrific rain, served on a toasted brioche bun with homemade chimichurri and just picked winter lettuces, it was delicious, warming, restorative, and uplifting in each savory bite.

Here’s the recipe, which features a stovetop cooking technique on a ridged grill pan or cast iron frying pan but also offers tips for grilling outside…if you care to brave the elements!

Lamb Burger with Mint, Coriander and Cumin

A juicy savory grilled lamb burger with fresh mint, coriander, and cumin
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time16 mins
Course: Main Course
Keyword: burger
Servings: 3

Equipment

  • ridged grill pan or cast iron frying pan
  • Pyrex bowl
  • spatula

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground lamb
  • 1/4 small onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
  • 1 egg
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped fresh mint
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh coriander
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • in a medium bowl combine the lamb, onion, panko, egg, fresh mint, fresh coriander, garlic, cumin, ground coriander and salt. With a spoon or very clean hands, combine the mixture thoroughly and divide into three even patties.
  • Spray the patties lightly with oil on both sides. Preheat a Le Creuset ridged grill pan or cast iron frying pan over high heat. Sear the lamb burgers one minute on each side. Then reduce the heat to moderately high and cook the lamb burgers for about five minutes on each side for medium doneness. (Alternatively cook the burgers on a grill, searing them for about a minute on each side and then moving them to moderately high heat on the grill and cook for about five minutes on each side as well.)
  • Serve the lamb burgers with traditional buns, brioche, pita bread or on a lightly dressed salad of seasonal greens.

My Organic Kitchen Garden Year in Review 2021

As a gardener I am constantly reminded that life can often be mysterious but it always comes full circle! Now that the leaves are falling here in Seattle and the winds are howling around the neighborhood, it’s always fun to do a Garden Year in Review!

Throughout the gardening season, which starts in January for me, I take photos and try to document what I did and when I did it! This proves helpful on many levels as it acts as a prompt for the next year. While perusing my photos this morning, I was reminded how this was a particularly busy (and beautiful!) year for us in the garden!

This year we added a flock of hens, a custom chicken coop, raised beds, an herb garden, multiple miniature David Austin roses, scented geraniums from Christianson’s Nursery, and an array of trellises to grow beans. I also kept my 200 square foot community garden plot and the food bank bed going at the Haller Lake P Patch near my home.

In review, the rewards were huge both in terms of produce, herbs, and flowers harvested as well as in the personal rewards of starting many things from seed and seeing them come to maturity, both in the garden and on the dinner table!

Tulips with Spode Milk Jug and Chinese Porcelain Bowl

For me, gardening isn’t a chore, it’s a creative outlet that lets me experiment and dabble, hoping it all comes to some form of fruition! Some things did great. My herb garden is booming. I harvested a ton of tomatoes, cabbage, chards, kales, and lettuces.

That said, our pole beans were more challenging and I had to replant one plot three times as some evasive and annoying critter was devouring the tendrils before they could get a grasp on life. I never solved that problem in that corner of the yard, gave up on the bean plot right there and decided to plant something else. In the end the pole beans planted elsewhere in the yard did ok so that one corner of my garden world remains a mystery!

I could certainly say a lot more about all this but for now, here’s a photo tour from my Kitchen Garden 2021!

Now, it’s time to spring ahead to 2022!

Yellow chard starts
Lavender drying in a willow basket
Costata Romanesco zucchini-a fabulous Italian heirloom
Chard with eggs
Sweet peas, mint and lavender

Laura Bush Petunias

Tips for Starting a Winter Kitchen Garden

Winter? Seriously? Who’s ready to think about THAT when we are celebrating Labor Day this weekend?

Well, here in Emerald City, I’m springing ahead to winter because now is the time to plant cold-hardy greens such as kale, chard, lettuces, and spinach.

Thanks to Seattle’s wet but relatively mild winters, I have had great luck growing a motley variety of greens. I’ve been doing it for over twenty years now and it’s always a great pleasure to go out into the garden on a cold dreary December afternoon to pick lettuce, collards, and sometimes even big Savoy cabbages for dinner.

At this point in the season, it’s too late to start cabbages by seed, as those seeds need to be sown in June for best results. That said, there’s still plenty of time to start some of the chef’s favorites such as cilantro, microgreens, kales, chard, and lettuces.

In fact, it’s exactly what I’m doing this week.

I’ve pulled up many of my spent and depleted summer plants such as Costata Romanesco zucchini, Romano beans, sunflowers, Hasta La Pasta spaghetti squash, and a few spindly tomato plants. In those naked sections of the garden, I’m turning the soil and watering it heavily to reinvigorate it before I sow any seeds. The next step will be to plant quick-growing varieties so they can get established and off to the races before the darker days start to settle in around October. Some of my favorites to plant now?

Try these

Cilantro

Arugula

Winter Bloomsdale Spinach

Chioggia Beets

Winter Density Lettuce

Provencal Winter Mix by Territorial Seeds

Yukon Winter Mix by Territorial Seeds

Arctic King

All of these varieties still have time to get established enough to produce and, in many cases with a little protection like a cloche, an upside-down glass salad bowl, or a frost blanket, they will make it through the winter and spring back to life in late February and March, just when the craving for fresh greens is really hitting home.

As I said, I’ve been winter gardening for over 20 years but as we continue to travel this pandemic pathway and suffer inflation and supply chain shortages of all ilks, I really think it’s time to rediscover the joy and practicality of winter gardening!

Just give it a GROW!